Course Number:
WR 123
Transcript Title:
Research Writing
Created:
Aug 17, 2022
Updated:
Aug 17, 2022
Total Credits:
4
Lecture Hours:
40
Lecture / Lab Hours:
0
Lab Hours:
0
Satisfies Cultural Literacy requirement:
No
Satisfies General Education requirement:
Yes
Grading Options
A-F, P/NP, Audit
Default Grading Options
A-F
Repeats available for credit:
0
Prerequisites

WR 121

Course Description

Continues writing sequence with emphasis on argumentation and extensive research. Develops skills in analysis and synthesis of varied responses to issues and/or course themes. Provides advanced instruction and practice in information literacy skills through use of library catalogs, databases, and other forms of research. Prerequisites: WR 121. Audit available.

Course Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
  1. Organize and manage an extended, research-based project of 3000-3500 words using MLA, APA, or other appropriate format.
  2. Evaluate and synthesize sources using critical thinking skills to draw reasonable inferences from various primary and secondary sources (including academic, printed, electronic, and interview-based); identify relationships between sources; as well as determine the structure of the sources and how they support student’s writing.
  3. Demonstrate skills necessary for research writing, including summary, paraphrase, and integration of evidence (i.e. direct quotation) into work with ethical and proper documentation.
  4. Independently locate, examine, select, and evaluate primary and secondary sources.
  5. Demonstrate control of research and voice, making an independent claim for intended audience, purpose, format, and genre.
  6. Generate texts in various modes (written and visual) to support, highlight, and elucidate student’s argument and focus.

Suggested Outcome Assessment Strategies

  • Active discussion of assigned and independently researched readings;
  • demonstration of research and proper documentation (MLA, APA, or other appropriate style);
  • writing of well-researched, properly documented long-term project and/or shorter papers;
  • research questions and study questions to drive project;
  • annotated bibliography;
  • group collaboration and participation;
  • personal and/or email interviews;
  • research journal to document research journey;
  • oral presentation. 

Course Activities and Design

The determination of teaching strategies used in the delivery of outcomes is generally left to the discretion of the instructor. Here are some strategies that you might consider when designing your course: lecture, small group/forum discussion, flipped classroom, dyads, oral presentation, role play, simulation scenarios, group projects, service learning projects, hands-on lab, peer review/workshops, cooperative learning (jigsaw, fishbowl), inquiry based instruction, differentiated instruction (learning centers), graphic organizers, etc.

Course Content

Outcome #1: Organize and manage an extended, research-based project of 3000-3500 words using MLA, APA, or other appropriate format.
  • Generating ideas (including freewriting, brainstorming, interviewing, etc.)
  • Thesis and Focus development/clarity of focus throughout extended project
  • Drafting texts in multiple genres that meet the needs of a wide audience
  • Determining and writing methodology essay/paragraph with the goal of reflecting on and communicating research process and evaluation techniques
  • Organization and management notes and research materials through research software (i.e. Zotero)
  • creation of a research journal with short reflection essays that document research process, brainstorm and refine ideas, organize sources, and consider how the student’s perspective changes throughout the term
  • Paragraph development activities that stress focus and unity through an extended research project
Outcome #2: Evaluate and synthesize sources using critical thinking skills to draw reasonable inferences from various primary and secondary sources (including academic, printed, electronic, and interview-based); identify relationships between sources; as well as determine the structure of the sources and how they support student’s own writing.
  • brainstorming to determine what types of sources will be most useful for writing situation and various audiences
  • evaluation techniques (CRAAP, etc.) to determine purpose and suitability for the project.
  • activities that highlight common and contrasting themes in sources on specific topics, determining conversations between sources and student’s place in the academic conversation (i.e. literature reviews)
Outcome #3: Demonstrate skills necessary for research writing, including summary, paraphrase, and integration of evidence (i.e. direct quotation) into work with proper documentation
  • practice paragraphing to balance the student’s voice with that of those they cite.
  • creation of assignments (e.g. annotated bibliography, research journal, or similar) that provide summaries of evidence and project how sources will fit into the project
  • activities that build documentation skills with various types of sources (e.g. interviews, electronic sources, books, articles, videos, speeches, etc.)
Outcome #4: Independently locate, examine, select, and evaluate primary and secondary sources.
  • various activities (e.g. scavenger hunt, bibliographies, etc.) where students use library databases and internet research to locate a variety of sources.
  • activities that stress close reading analysis and promote student response (e.g. examination of text for purpose, syntax, diction, organization, etc. and student response and reflection essays)
Outcome #5: Demonstrate control of research and voice, making an independent claim for intended audience, purpose, format, and genre
  • collaborative activities that help students refine, claim and practice verbalizing argument and support
  • analysis of audience and activities to adapt style and diction to fit needs of diverse audiences
Outcome #6: Generate texts in various modes (written and visual) to support, highlight, and elucidate student’s argument and focus. Activities might include:
  • oral presentations with students explaining position/focus and identifying and explaining supporting points and evidence
  • analysis and/or creation of visual texts to support focus/argument (e.g. digital storytelling, video and image galleries)
  • cultivation of visual or written project that features student research with historical and cultural context
  • reflections (via a journal or similar) that examine the research process and how multimodal instruction influences student understanding of a topic
  • poster presentations that feature research question, argument, and support of position

Suggested Texts and Materials