College Composition

Course Number: WR 121
Transcript Title: College Composition
Created: September 1, 2012
Updated: May 5, 2022
Total Credits: 4
Lecture Hours: 40
Lecture / Lab Hours: 0
Lab Hours: 0
Satisfies Cultural Literacy requirement: No
Satisfies General Education requirement: No
Grading options: A-F (default), P-NP, audit
Repeats available for credit: 0

Prerequisites

Placement into WR 121, or completion of WR 115 and RD 115

Course Description

 Introduces academic writing as a means of inquiry. Employs critical reading, discussion and the writing process to explore ideas, develop cultural awareness and formulate positions. Emphasizes development of a variety of strategies to present evidence in support of a thesis. Prerequisite: Placement into WR 121, or completion of WR 115 and RD 115. Audit available.

Intended Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Read closely to determine a writer’s purpose and perspective.
  2. Write for a variety of clearly defined purposes, audiences and contexts.
  3. Write clear and coherent essays that demonstrate a logical development of ideas and incorporate evidence in support of a thesis.
  4. Research, evaluate and use information effectively and ethically to develop an informed position and encourage intellectual curiosity.
  5. Write and revise coherent essays using MLA format.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

  1. Written assignments designed to promote integration of class material.
  2. Written or oral assignments designed to stimulate critical thinking.
  3. Multiple choice, short answer, and essay questions that require integration, application, and critical examination of material covered in class.
  4. Active participation in class discussion.
  5. In-class participation in individual and group exercises, activities, or class presentations.
  6. Written essays.
  7. Design and completion of a research project.

Texts and Materials

Materials may include a variety of articles, essays, info-graphs and other sources representing a wide range of purposes, strategies and arguments from diverse authors on significant, meaningful, and (often) contemporary issues. These sources may be drawn from scholarly journals, reputable news sources, textbooks, podcasts, other media, and OER resources. Grammar handbooks--print or online/OER may be useful.

No specific texts are required. Our department recommends using OER materials whenever possible. There are many, with more being produced all the time. Two places to locate OER materials include oercommons.org and openoregon.org. Suggested titles for English Composition are:

Course Activities and Design

The determination of teaching strategies used in the delivery of outcomes is generally left to the discretion of the instructor. Here are some strategies that you might consider when designing your course: lecture, small group/forum discussion, flipped classroom, dyads, oral presentation, role play, simulation scenarios, group projects, service learning projects, hands-on lab, peer review/workshops, cooperative learning (jigsaw, fishbowl), inquiry based instruction, differentiated instruction (learning centers), graphic organizers, etc.

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

Outcome #1: Read closely to determine a writer’s purpose and perspective.
  • Targeted close reading (includes focused examination of textual features such as syntax, diction, argument, plot, organization, etc.)  
  • Summaries of Model Texts
  • Reading Analysis and Responses
Outcome #2: Write for a variety of clearly defined purposes, audiences and contexts.
  • Generating ideas (includes brainstorming, free-write, research, interviews)
  • Thesis development/clarity of focus
  • Drafting essays in different genres
  • Editing and Revising (including critiquing peer essays, analyzing comments, formulating a global revision and editing plan)
  • Presentation of ideas using academic standards
Outcome #3: Write clear and coherent essays that demonstrate a logical development of ideas and incorporate evidence in support of a thesis.
  • Organizing ideas for different genres (graphic organizers, outlines, etc.)
  • Paragraph development (integrating and explicating evidence, creating topic sentences)
  • Editing and Revising (i.e. revising organization using reverse outlines)
Outcome #4: Research, evaluate and use information effectively and ethically to develop an informed position and encourage intellectual curiosity.
  • Use of CGCC library resources:  books, journals, databases, videos
  • Evaluation activities (CRAAP test, etc.)
  • Identification and use of scholarly sources
  • Citing sources via MLA or APA style
Outcome #5: Write and revise coherent essays using MLA format.
  • Use MLA style guides to evaluate various resources for publication information
  • Identify the variance in citation based on form (books, journals, databases, videos, interviews, etc.)
  • Integrate and cite evidence into essays using MLA format.
  • Revision of both in-text citation and works cited from rough to final drafts