Human Development

Course Number: PSY 215
Transcript Title: Human Development
Created: September 1, 2012
Updated: March 14, 2020
Total Credits: 4
Lecture Hours: 40
Lecture / Lab Hours: 0
Lab Hours: 0
Satisfies Cultural Literacy requirement: No
Satisfies General Education requirement: Yes
Grading options: A-F (default), P-NP, audit
Repeats available for credit: 0

Prerequisites

MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Prerequisite/concurrent: WR 121.

Recommended

PSY 201A or PSY 202A

Course Description

Surveys major developmental theories and patterns of change and continuity from birth to death in human subjects. Emphasizes biological, cognitive, and emotional development through the lifespan. Examines cultural influences on development. Recommended: PSY 201A or 202A. Prerequisites: MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Prerequisite/concurrent: WR 121. Audit available.

Intended Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding by elaborating on how gender, ethnicity, class, historical period, and social location contribute to the developmental experience throughout the lifespan.
  2. Identify and explain key issues and concepts relevant to the understanding of how human behavior develops over the life span and be able to explain them to a layperson.
  3. Provide examples from literature and current media that describe development — including dynamic interaction of biological, cognitive & psychosocial or social/emotional/cultural perspectives — as an ongoing set of processes, involving both continuity and change.
  4. Contrast and explain the key points of typical and atypical development across stages of the lifespan.
  5. Demonstrate knowledge of the research and literature on central questions in the birth-to-death developmental process, including continuity, sources of development, and individual differences.

Alignment with Institutional Core Learning Outcomes

Major 1. Communicate effectively using appropriate reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. (Communication)

Major

2. Creatively solve problems by using relevant methods of research, personal reflection, reasoning, and evaluation of information. (Critical thinking and Problem-Solving)

Not addressed

3. Extract, interpret, evaluate, communicate, and apply quantitative information and methods to solve problems, evaluate claims, and support decisions in their academic, professional and private lives. (Quantitative Literacy)

Minor

4. Use an understanding of cultural differences to constructively address issues that arise in the workplace and community. (Cultural Awareness)

Minor

5. Recognize the consequences of human activity upon our social and natural world. (Community and Environmental Responsibility)

To establish an intentional learning environment, Core Learning Outcomes (CLOs) require a clear definition of instructional strategies, evidence of recurrent instruction, and employment of several assessment modes.

Major Designation

  1. The outcome is addressed recurrently in the curriculum, regularly enough to establish a thorough understanding.
  2. Students can demonstrate and are assessed on a thorough understanding of the outcome.
    • The course includes at least one assignment that can be assessed by applying the appropriate CLO rubric.

Minor Designation

  1. The outcome is addressed adequately in the curriculum, establishing fundamental understanding.
  2. Students can demonstrate and are assessed on a fundamental understanding of the outcome.
    • The course includes at least one assignment that can be assessed by applying the appropriate CLO rubric.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Students may demonstrate learning outcomes by any or all of the following:

  1. Individual or in-group class presentations pertaining to the applications of concepts, theories or issues in human development.
  2. Design and complete a research project that can take the form of a developmental interview, an observation or assessment through service learning.
  3. First hand observation of children of all ages in the classroom, at home, or at a daycare, to identify patterns of growth and development.
  4. Interviews or observations of adolescents or adults to identify patterns of growth and development.
  5. Develop and maintain a Reflection Journal.
  6. Scores obtained from essay and or objective tests.
  7. Attendance, classroom participation, small group interactions.
  8. Research and write about relevant topics.

Texts and Materials

  • Recommended: Lifespan Development, Lumen Learning (OER Text)
  • Second Option: Rathus, S. A. (2013). HDEV 3. Belmont, CA,: Cengage Learning.

Course Activities and Design

The determination of teaching strategies used in the delivery of outcomes is generally left to the discretion of the instructor. Here are some strategies that you might consider when designing your course: lecture, small group/forum discussion, flipped classroom, dyads, oral presentation, role play, simulation scenarios, group projects, service learning projects, hands-on lab, peer review/workshops, cooperative learning (jigsaw, fishbowl), inquiry based instruction, differentiated instruction (learning centers), graphic organizers, etc.

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

Outcome #1: Demonstrate an understanding by elaborating on how gender, ethnicity, class, historical period, and social location contribute to the developmental experience throughout the lifespan.

CC: Issues in human development:

  • Nature versus Nurture issue in human development.
  • Continuity versus Discontinuity in human development.
  • Universal versus Context-specific development issue.
Outcome #2: Identify and explain key issues and concepts relevant to the understanding of how human behavior develops over the life span and be able to explain them to a layperson.

CC: Developmental Theories:

  • Grand or Major Theories including psychodynamic theories, learning theories, and cognitive developmental theory.
  • Emergent Theories including ecological, socio-cultural, and epigenetic theories.
Outcome #3: Provide examples from literature and current media that describe development — including dynamic interaction of biological, cognitive & psychosocial or social/emotional/cultural perspectives — as an ongoing set of processes, involving both continuity and change.

CC: Issues in human development:

  • Nature versus Nurture issue in human development.
  • Continuity versus Discontinuity in human development.
  • Universal versus Context-specific development issue.
Outcome #4: Contrast and explain the key points of typical and atypical development across stages of the lifespan.

CC:  Development covered from a chronological, a topical or mixed approach to development including:

  • Prenatal development and infancy
  • Early childhood
  • Middle childhood
  • Adolescence
  • Young adulthood
  • Middle adulthood
  • Late adulthood
  • Death
Outcome #5: Demonstrate knowledge of the research and literature on central questions in the developmental process, including continuity, sources of development, and individual differences.

CC:  Research Methods in Human Development:

  • Experimental
  • Correlational