Aluminum GTAW/TIG Welding

Course Number: MFG 280
Transcript Title: Aluminum GTAW/TIG Welding
Created: June 16, 2020
Updated: June 16, 2020
Total Credits: 3
Lecture Hours: 0
Lecture / Lab Hours: 60
Lab Hours: 0
Satisfies Cultural Literacy requirement: No
Satisfies General Education requirement: No
Grading options: A-F (default), P-NP, audit
Repeats available for credit: 0

Prerequisites

Prerequisite / Concurrent

Course Description

Introduces students to the use of GTAW/TIG equipment on aluminum alloys, and the methods and techniques for welding on them.  Explores different electrical waveforms and frequencies needed for joint, pipe and butt weldment as well as covering prep of materials, consumables and tungsten. Prerequisite: WLD 195; Prerequisite/concurrent: MFG 150. Audit available.

Intended Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate understanding of AC GTAW wavelengths, frequencies and welder setup for aluminum weldments in manufacturing.
  2. Identify the different types, properties and common uses of different aluminum alloys as they pertain to manufacturing.
  3. Manufacture aluminum butt, fillet and pipe welds with correct filler selection.
  4. Correctly clean and prep aluminum weldments and consumables including tungsten.
  5. Understand AC GTAW machine operation, setup and assembly of torch parts.
  6. Manufacture a basic aluminum pressure vessel.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Outcomes are assessed through a mixture of hands on and written assessments.  Priority is given to hands-on proficiency based assessment in an environment that rewards demonstration of skill needed for success in industry.

  • Lecture and in booth coaching and direct instruction
  • Direct instruction in full class demonstration of skills
  • Written exams
  • Student proficiency through demonstration of learned strategies and skills in industry standard environment.
  • Mock AWS Testing procedure or mock local industry supported on-site testing procedures.
  • Assessment of soft / skills and job readiness based on performance.

Texts and Materials

Safety glasses are provided; it is recThe determination of teaching strategies used in the delivery of outcomes is generally left to the discretion of the instructor. Here are some strategies that you might consider when designing your course: lecture, small group/forum discussion, flipped classroom, dyads, oral presentation, role play, simulation scenarios, group projects, service learning projects, hands-on lab, peer review/workshops, cooperative learning (jigsaw, fishbowl), inquiry based instruction, differentiated instruction (learning centers), graphic organizers, etc.ommended that students purchase their own pair as the shared glasses do get easily damaged.  Students may also find it worthwhile to purchase some of the welding equipment that is normally shared such as a welding helmet, welding jacket, welding gloves, angle grinder, a square, a magnetic triangle, c-clamps and vice grip clamps.  All these materials are provided at this level, but are usually required to be provided by the employee in industry. Welded materials and basic consumables are provided for students through department budget and lab fees.

Course Activities and Design

The determination of teaching strategies used in the delivery of outcomes is generally left to the discretion of the instructor. Here are some strategies that you might consider when designing your course: lecture, small group/forum discussion, flipped classroom, dyads, oral presentation, role play, simulation scenarios, group projects, service learning projects, hands-on lab, peer review/workshops, cooperative learning (jigsaw, fishbowl), inquiry based instruction, differentiated instruction (learning centers), graphic organizers, etc.

This course mixes lecture and lab time evenly.  Most classes will start with a lecture to introduce new content and usually one or more content appropriate readings per week from industry.  Instructor demonstrations follow lectures to show skill in use. Students’ progress to work hands-on in the lab under individual guidance and coaching from the instructor in the lab.

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

Outcome #1: Demonstrate understanding of AC GTAW wavelengths, frequencies and welder setup for aluminum weldments in manufacturing.
  • Identify sine waveforms, and explain the use of sine waveforms in AC GTAW welding through lecture and reading first, and later by machine manipulation and use.
  • Identify square waveforms and explain the use of square waveforms in AC GTAW welding through lecture and reading first, and later by machine manipulation and use.
  • Demonstrate and the use of frequency and the effect of frequency on the puddle and weld characteristics in AC GTAW welding through lecture and reading first, and later by machine manipulation and use.
  • Understand the use of balance and its effect on the tungsten and surface of the material in AC GTAW welding, through lecture first, and later by machine manipulation and use.
Outcome #2:Identify the different types, properties and common uses of different aluminum alloys as they pertain to manufacturing.
  • Know characteristics and qualities of different aluminum alloys and its appropriate uses in relation to corrosion resistance (Lecture, Reading, Demonstration, Hands-on Lab)
  • Know welding and machining characteristics of different aluminum alloys and why some alloys are more desirable than others dependent on operation (Lecture, Reading, Demonstration, Hands-on Lab)
  • Identify different aluminum alloy’s tolerance of heat and vibration in the welded zone (Lecture, Reading, Demonstration, Hands-on Lab)
  • Explain the basic metallurgical differences of different aluminum alloys (Lecture, Reading, Hands-on Lab)
Outcome #3: Manufacture aluminum butt, fillet and pipe welds with correct filler selection.
  • Perform pipe, butt, and fillet welds on aluminum of varying thicknesses using GTAW welder in lab. (Lecture, Demonstration, Hands-on Lab)
  • Adjust sine and square waveforms to appropriately provide penetration on aluminum butt, fillet and pipe welds on aluminum of varying thicknesses (Lecture, Demonstration, Hands-on Lab)
  • Identify different types of filler rod alloys and their appropriate usage based on use and knowledge from (Reading, Demonstration, Hands-on Lab)
Outcome #4:Correctly clean and prep aluminum weldments and consumables including tungsten.
  • Understand principles of oxidation of aluminum (Lecture, Reading, Demonstration, Hands-on Lab)
  • Practice what mechanical process can remove oxidation from aluminum (Lecture, Demonstration, Hands-on Lab)
  • Practice what chemical processes can remove oxidation from aluminum (Lecture, Demonstration, Hands-on Lab)
  • Prepare different types of tungsten and appropriate sharpening practices and procedures for those types of tungsten (Lecture, Demonstration, Hands-on Lab)
Outcome #5: Understand AC GTAW machine operation, setup and assembly of torch parts.
  • Understand amperage ramp rates by thickness and alloy of aluminum (Lecture, Demonstration, Hands-on Lab)
  • Know basic principles of pulse operation (Lecture, Reading, Demonstration, Hands-on Lab)
  • Program frequency and balance for appropriate penetration and arc cone profile (Reading, Demonstration, Hands-on Lab)
  • Define gas flow rates for weld size and alloy (Demonstration, Hands-on Lab)
  • Practice assembly and identification of all torch parts (Hands-on Lab, Demonstration, Graphic Organizer)
  • Find common symptoms of failed machine and torch body parts and know how to replace them. (Demonstration, Hands-on Lab)
Outcome #6: Manufacture a basic aluminum pressure vessel.
  • Build square tube aluminum pressure vessel capable of holding 22 psi (Demonstration, Hands-on Lab)
  • Build round tube aluminum pressure vessel capable of holding 22 psi. (Demonstration, Hands-on Lab)

Department Notes

Safety glasses are required at all times in the welding lab, and are provided for students. Students may also purchase their own safety glasses from a local supplier. Long pants and closed toed shoes are required in the welding lab at all times. Appropriate clothing must be worn to work in the lab (no synthetic materials, ect.). Safety requirements are covered prior to work in the lab.