Integrated Manufacturing 2

Course Number: MFG 157
Transcript Title: Integrated Manufacturing 2
Created: March 25, 2021
Updated: March 25, 2021
Total Credits: 3
Lecture Hours: 0
Lecture / Lab Hours: 60
Lab Hours: 0
Satisfies Cultural Literacy requirement: No
Satisfies General Education requirement: No
Grading options: A-F (default), P-NP, audit
Repeats available for credit: 0

Prerequisites

Course Description

Covers the creation of multi-part assemblies and the process of welding them together to specification. Builds on the precision measuring and quality control tolerance checks introduced in MFG 156. Discusses the integration of efficiencies and lean manufacturing principles in the everyday operations of a manufacturing business. Teaches how to build fixtures that accurately and repeatedly create product to tolerance. Prerequisites MFG 156. Audit available.

Intended Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Create complex multi-part assemblies using self-created blueprints and tolerances to demonstrate prototype manufacturing principles and processes.
  2. Integrate lean manufacturing principles into new and existing blueprints and designs.
  3. Perform nesting and multiple part processing in 3axis CNC processes.
  4. Build assemblies that use mandrel bending equipment and accurately measure and bend tubing to specification.
  5. Fabricate fixtures/jigs to accurately, repeatedly and quickly replicate assemblies and product.
  6. Use precision measuring to check tolerances of built assemblies for quality control, including checking and adjustment of fixtures/jigs.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Outcomes are assessed through a mixture of hands on and written assessments.  Priority is given to hands-on proficiency based assessment in an environment that rewards demonstration of skill needed for success in industry.

  • Lecture and in booth coaching and direct instruction.
  • Direct instruction in full class demonstration of skills.
  • Written exams.
  • Student proficiency through demonstration of learned strategies and skills in industry standard environment.
  • Mock AWS Testing procedure (destructive testing) or mock local industry supported on-site testing procedures.
  • Job readiness based on performance.
  • In class lab experiments and testing using the scientific process with written result reporting.

Texts and Materials

Resources are available openly on the web, but largely the curriculum adaptation needs to be done based on the instructors existing skill set.  Since there are many ways to teach the content, the “teach what you know, and teach well what you do” is very appropriate for courses like this.

The following books are recommended:
  • Welding Skills, 5th Edition, B.J. Moniz
  • Welding Skills Workbook, 5th Edition, Jonathan F. Gosse
Some Suggested resources:
  • AWS Structural Code Book 2020
  • Aeorspacewelding.com
  • Thefabricator.com
  • Aws.org
  • Millerwelds.com
  • Lincolnelectric.com

Course Activities and Design

The determination of teaching strategies used in the delivery of outcomes is generally left to the discretion of the instructor. Here are some strategies that you might consider when designing your course: lecture, small group/forum discussion, flipped classroom, dyads, oral presentation, role play, simulation scenarios, group projects, service learning projects, hands-on lab, peer review/workshops, cooperative learning (jigsaw, fishbowl), inquiry based instruction, differentiated instruction (learning centers), graphic organizers, etc.

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

Outcome #1: Create complex multi-part assemblies using self-created blueprints and tolerances to demonstrate prototype manufacturing principles and processes.
  • Using best practices, design multipart assemblies including blueprints and orthographic projects using digital design software taking into account tolerance and manufacturing cost.
  • Integrate tubing/pipe in to design processes seamlessly including correct weld blueprint and annotation.
  • Build from own prints to tolerance complex multi-part assemblies.  
  • Test prototype assembly in intended application and collect appropriate research and development data.
Outcome #2: Integrate lean manufacturing principles into new and existing blueprints and designs.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of multiple types of lean manufacturing principles and how they apply to the manufacturing spectrum.
  • Identify procedural and process based changes based on research and development data from Outcome #1 to streamline timeline and increase cost efficiency of product creation.
  • Explain how lean manufacturing process and practices are a key to success for small businesses in the local manufacturing and development environment.
Outcome #3: Perform nesting and multiple part processing in 3axis CNC processes.
  • Define nesting and multiple part processing in terms of coding and processing of blueprints for fabrication.
  • Improve efficiency of existing design and blueprint by redesigning nesting and cutting procedures using existing tooling.
  • Look at scope production and improve efficiency by integrating multiple processes and products in the same steps of production.
Outcome #4: Build assemblies that use mandrel bending equipment and accurately measure and bend tubing to specification.
  • Using knowledge and necessary applied math, accurately create prototype product from tube using mandrel bending equipment. 
  • Demonstrate appropriate tube/pipe notching and coping using integrated math to calculate angle of notch.
  • Identify opportunities to simplify designs using tubing/pipe with bending equipment.
  • Show mathematical process to calculate angles and radiuses needed to produce product from tube or pipe.
Outcome #5: Fabricate fixtures/jigs to accurately, repeatedly and quickly replicate assemblies and product.
  • Taking existing product, propose a fixture/jig that will increase production efficiency.
  • Use appropriate feedback from production floor (class feedback) to implement fixture/jig and design using CAD processes.
  • Build fixture/jig to test and check for an increase in efficiency compared to previous manufacturing process.
  • Calculate cost savings in man hours and materials by using data collected to show process and procedural improvement in the manufacturing process.
Outcome #6: Use precision measuring to check tolerances of built assemblies for quality control, including checking and adjustment of fixtures/jigs.
  • Show appropriate use of bore/scope equipment to check tubing and piping for deflection and warp.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of micrometer use for quality control purposes.
  • Identify appropriate tolerances for an assembly and apply to fixtures using precision measuring techniques.
  • Demonstrate ability to do routine checks of fixture/jigs tolerance to ensure accurate and repeatable production.

Department Notes

Safety glasses are required at all times in the welding lab and are provided for students. Students may also purchase their own safety glasses from a local supplier. Long pants and closed toed shoes are required in the welding lab at all times. Appropriate clothing must be worn to work in the lab (no synthetic materials, ect.). Safety requirements are covered prior to work in the lab.