Fabrication Processes 2

Course Number: MFG 152
Transcript Title: Fabrication Processes 2
Created: March 25, 2021
Updated: March 25, 2021
Total Credits: 3
Lecture Hours: 0
Lecture / Lab Hours: 60
Lab Hours: 0
Satisfies Cultural Literacy requirement: No
Satisfies General Education requirement: No
Grading options: A-F (default), P-NP, audit
Repeats available for credit: 0

Prerequisites

Course Description

Introduces common remanufacturing principles as well as basic material science as it applies to welding and weld processes in the manufacturing environment. Covers in depth material handling and processing for mild steel welding projects as well as mark up and annotation for large project work. Teaches skills a welding floor foreman would routinely use. Prerequisites: MFG 150. Audit available.

Intended Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of common welding repairs and processes for remanufacture or repair of equipment.
  2. Apply basic materials science as it relates to mild steel and how manufacturing processes affect these materials.
  3. Use a carbon arc cutting rod and understand the CAC process and its uses in industry.
  4. Identify common material and handling processes for longevity of materials manufactured out of mild steel.
  5. Apply annotation to large scale fabrication projects, allowing welding teams to accurately complete large team based tasks.
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of coefficients of thermal expansion and their considerations as they apply to welding processes that occur on-site or in-field.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Outcomes are assessed through a mixture of hands on and written assessments.  Priority is given to hands-on proficiency based assessment in an environment that rewards demonstration of skill needed for success in industry.

  • Lecture and in booth coaching and direct instruction.
  • Direct instruction in full class demonstration of skills.
  • Written exams.
  • Student proficiency through demonstration of learned strategies and skills in industry standard environment.
  • Local industry supported on-site testing procedures.
  • Assessment of job readiness based on performance.
  • In class lab experiments and testing using the scientific process with written result reporting.

Texts and Materials

Resources are available openly on the web, but largely the curriculum adaptation needs to be done based on the instructors existing skill set.  Since there are many ways to teach the content, the “teach what you know, and teach well what you do” is very appropriate for courses like this.

The following books are recommended:
  • Welding Skills, 5th Edition, B.J. Moniz
  • Welding Skills Workbook, 5th Edition, Jonathan F. Gosse
  • Print Reading for Welders, 5th Edition, Thomas E. Proctor, Jonathan F. Goss
Some Suggested resources:
  • AWS Structural Code Book 2020
  • Aeorspacewelding.com
  • Thefabricator.com
  • Aws.org
  • Millerwelds.com
  • Lincolnelectric.com

Course Activities and Design

The determination of teaching strategies used in the delivery of outcomes is generally left to the discretion of the instructor. Here are some strategies that you might consider when designing your course: lecture, small group/forum discussion, flipped classroom, dyads, oral presentation, role play, simulation scenarios, group projects, service learning projects, hands-on lab, peer review/workshops, cooperative learning (jigsaw, fishbowl), inquiry based instruction, differentiated instruction (learning centers), graphic organizers, etc.

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

Outcome #1: Demonstrate knowledge of common welding repairs and processes for remanufacture or repair of equipment.
  • Identify different types of welding, manufacturing or usage damage and cause of that damage on existing equipment or product.
  • Identify different types of damage caused by incorrect procedure, and identify repair process on new equipment or product.
  • Demonstrate repair processes for different types of identified damage in welded and manufactured product.
  • Understand the correct repair process and procedure to ensure long service life of repaired components.
Outcome #2: Apply basic materials science as it relates to mild steel and how manufacturing processes affect these materials.
  • Experiment with hardness, brittleness and ductility of mild steel before welding using the scientific process.
  • Demonstrate the difference processed and welded product has in hardness, brittleness and ductility.
  • Explain the basic metallurgical differences of mild steel before and after different processes are applied using empirical evidence.
  • Identify different materials and alloys of those materials using readily available processes in the manufacturing environment.
Outcome #3: Use a carbon arc cutting rod (CAC) and understand the CAC process and its uses in industry.
  • Understand the use of CAC processes in manufacturing and repair processes.
  • Use CAC processes to create appropriate crack repair.
  • Use CAC processes to appropriately repair incorrectly or poorly welded joints.
  • Use CAC processes to create appropriate joints for full fusion and penetration of product previously incorrectly assembled or welded.
Outcome #4: Identify common material handling processes for longevity of materials manufactured out of mild steel.
  • Understand different coatings applied to raw material to prevent rust and oxidation of mild steel prior to use.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of processes and by-processes used at the mill to prevent rust and oxidation of raw mild steels.
  • Understand mechanical processes used to prevent rust and oxidation prior to use.
  • Demonstrate chemical processes used to remove rust and oxidation before use of mild steel for manufacturing.
  • Demonstrate mechanical processes used to remove rust and oxidation before use of mild steel for manufacturing.
Outcome #5: Apply annotation to large scale fabrication projects, allowing welding teams to accurately complete large team based tasks.
  • Understand common shorthand and symbols used for large project annotation.
  • Demonstrate necessary knowledge of symbols and common shorthand a foreperson would use to accurately annotate large scale projects for a team of welders.
  • Identify proper procedural order and process order and describe annotation of that order so teams on multiple shifts can accurately accomplish a large scale manufacturing product.
  • Interpret Weld Procedure Specifications and apply annotation to projects so welding teams can precisely manufacture product without defect.
Outcome #6: Demonstrate knowledge of coefficients of thermal expansion and their considerations as they apply to welding processes that occur on-site or in-field and in controlled environments.
  • Understand the mathematical expression of the coefficient of thermal expansion of steel.
  • Use the mathematical expression of the coefficient of thermal expansion to inform welding process and procedure for field work.
  • Use the mathematical expression of the coefficient of thermal expansion to inform the welding process and procedure for manufacturing in controlled environments.

Department Notes

Safety glasses are required at all times in the welding lab and are provided for students. Students may also purchase their own safety glasses from a local supplier. Long pants and closed toed shoes are required in the welding lab at all times. Appropriate clothing must be worn to work in the lab (no synthetic materials, ect.). Safety requirements are covered prior to work in the lab.