ESOL Writing

Course Number: ESOL 60
Transcript Title: ESOL Writing
Created: June 10, 2020
Updated: June 10, 2020
Total Credits: 0
Lecture Hours: 0
Lecture / Lab Hours: 30
Lab Hours: 0
Satisfies Cultural Literacy requirement: No
Satisfies General Education requirement: No
Grading options:
Repeats available for credit: 100

Course Description

Focuses on effective use of written English in a range of simple, functional and narrative texts with an eye to preparing students for successful transition to work, college and/or occupational training programs. Includes explicit instruction for non-native speakers in English writing mechanics and composition style and skills. Exposes students to regular practice with English text, academic language and vocabulary, and a variety of models of creative and nonfiction writing.

Intended Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Communicate with beginning fluency in English writing using a variety of sentence structures, paragraphs and short forms that express a comprehension of correct English grammar, spelling, punctuation, coherence and clarity.
  2. Employ a variety of common pre-writing strategies to generate, plan and organize new writing.
  3. Utilize basic word processing skills.
  4. Applycooperative learning and writing workshop strategies that assist in generating and revising individual and peer writing.
  5. Use critical thinking to respond to a variety of English texts that include enriched and introductory academic vocabulary and idiomatic language.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

  • Participation in individual and group writing and revision activities.
  • Regular attendance and participation in class discussions, writing workshops, and learning activities.
  • Grammar, spelling, vocabulary, and punctuation practice exercises.
  • Paragraph Development practice exercises.
  • A reading response journal.
  • Homework assignments.
  • Final typed paragraphs and short forms.
  • Email communication with instructor.
  • Classroom demonstrations and small group sharing activities.

Course Activities and Design

The determination of teaching strategies used in the delivery of outcomes is generally left to the discretion of the instructor. Here are some strategies that you might consider when designing your course: lecture, small group/forum discussion, flipped classroom, dyads, oral presentation, role play, simulation scenarios, group projects, service learning projects, hands-on lab, peer review/workshops, cooperative learning (jigsaw, fishbowl), inquiry based instruction, differentiated instruction (learning centers), graphic organizers, etc.

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

Outcome #1: Communicate with beginning fluency in English writing using a variety of sentence structures, paragraphs and short forms that express a comprehension of correct English grammar, spelling, punctuation, coherence and clarity.
  • Construct text in coherently linked simple, compound and complex sentences.
  • Arrange, expand and connect sentences for variety.
  • Use English language conventions in order to increase reader comprehension and meet writing purpose.
  • Recognize and use complex grammar structures such as: pronouns in proper case; verb tense to convey times, sequences, states, and conditions; adjective order; and subordinating conjunctions, conjunctive adverbs, and transitions words to construct complex sentences and paragraphs.
  • Develop knowledge of correct English spelling through study of syllable patterns; roots, suffixes and prefixes; and common English spelling rules.
  • Acquire language to talk about writing
  • Recognize name and correct uses of punctuation marks: commas, apostrophes, quotation marks, colons and semicolons.
  • Check for commonly misused and confused words.
  • Conduct short research projects or interviews to use as sources to write a few connected paragraphs about a main idea with evidence of simple organizational structure and specific content
  • Summarize information from print or digital sources into simple sentences and paragraphs.
  • Draw on prior experience, research, and one’s own questions, interests and observations to generate ideas for short form texts.
  • Develop and organize ideas and supporting evidence in simple narrative, descriptive, persuasive, expository or creative text with growing confidence in a range of texts through frequent and varied practice and product writing assignments. 
  • Write a paragraph on a stated main idea that includes topic sentences, reasons, details, or examples, and a concluding sentence.
  • Support major ideas and arguments with evidence and the use of linking words and phrases.
Outcome #2:  Employ a variety of common pre-writing strategies to generate, plan and organize new writing.
  • Use borrowed Writing—copying and modeling
  • Define purpose and audience for writing
  • Select and use strategies appropriate to purpose and audience
  • Generate ideas for writing with writing starters, lists, questions, brainstorming, free writing, visualization and storytelling
  • Use sentence and paragraph frames, poetic forms or patterns
  • Learn planning strategies such as mind mapping and clustering, flow charts, ven-diagrams, outlining, KWL
  • Develop topic by defining focus and scope of writing
  • Organize ideas through classification of content, chronological sequencing, cause and effect, and comparing and contrasting.
Outcome #3:  Utilize basic word processing skills.
  • Use basic typing tutor programs
  • Use college email to communicate with other students and teachers
  • Use simple word processing tools to format, edit and make revisions
  • Use tools such as dictionaries, thesauruses, editing checklists, and simple rubrics
  • Use word processing tools to enhance readability through the use of text features such as spellcheck, headings, white space, bullets, margins, and graphics
Outcome #4:  Applycooperative learning and writing workshop strategies that assist in generating and revising individual and peer writing.
  • Do frequent classroom free writes from random prompts to build fluency in generating content.
  • Participate in oral sharing of unedited free writes to build confidence in sharing stories and ideas with peers to connect to the fact that writing is to be read by others.
  • Learn about what makes good writing by identifying for others what you find is specifically strong, memorable or captivating in their writing when others read aloud their unedited free writes.
  • Learn about what makes your writing good by listening openly when other students give specific positive comment on what is strong, memorable or captivating when you read your unedited free writes aloud to class.
  • Use self-review and feedback from others to revise text       
  • In small groups or with partners collaborate with others to use revision tools such as checklists, questions, looking for important points or redundant language, and deletion of unnecessary information. Give responsive feedback based on achieving clarity or mitigating confusion (I’m confused here, tell me more about this, which happened first or second, what are the relationships between these things. etc?)
  • Participate in activities that acknowledge that writing is a recursive activity by performing multiple re readings of texts to make content revisions for fidelity to purpose, clarity, and considerations of thoroughness and coherence.
  • With peers work on sentence level revisions: fragment, run-on, native word order (placement of adjectives and adverbs), sentence length and type, punctuation for meaning, unnecessary or missing words, sentence structure and organization, effective pronoun use, effective use of transitions words, consistent verb tense.
  • Identify what is working, what is strong, what you’d like to see more of in peer writing when helping to revise or edit.
  • Identify and encourage the use of action verbs and specific nouns in place of general terms and the over use of adverbs and adjectives in the revision process.
  • Build the skills of what native English “sounds” like. During peer editing, partners read aloud exactly what is written to help author “hear” writing and “hear” the errors in their own writing.
  • During peer revision activates ask for clarification or expansion to assist author’s enrichment of writing.
  • Participate in interactive writing, shared dictations, shared research, written conversations, group writing of a story or expository writing. 
Outcome #5:  Use critical thinking to respond to a variety of English texts that include enriched and introductory academic vocabulary and idiomatic language.
  • Use writing as a pre-reading and post-reading activity
  • Close reading and analysis of a diverse range of ESOL appropriate texts
  • Apply prior knowledge (schema) of content and situation, including cultural understanding and bias, to support comprehension.
  • Choose from a range of simple comprehension strategies…5W’s, Main Ideas and Supporting Details, Introduction/ Body/Conclusion, Purpose, Compare and Contrast, Cause and Effect, Poetry, Prediction, etc. to improve reading comprehension
  • Draw conclusions related to common structural elements of simple literary works.
  • Connect content in one text to those in another text and/or to real life examples 
  • Respond in writing to texts in a reader’s journal, dialogue journal or circle written discussions with peers.
  • Identify author’s point of view, purpose, biases, conclusions
  • Use context skills and word structure skills to decipher new vocabulary
  • Incorporate new and idiomatic vocabulary in personal writing
  • Use prefixes and suffixes to build words that express abstract concept
  • Maintain personal dictionaries of new words and use everyday, academic and precise language to convey meaning in writing.
  • Study figurative and literal language in reading and writing
  • Form associations between new words and known words by study of word parts, grammatical clues, cognates, contexts for use of words, lists of common academic vocabulary, and creating word maps, diagrams and tables of vocabulary.
  • Pick out common idiomatic language in texts then practice using English idioms in personal writing samples and journals.