S.T.E.A.M: Birth to Age 8

Course Number: ECE 232
Transcript Title: S.T.E.A.M: Birth to Age 8
Created: March 26, 2021
Updated: March 26, 2021
Total Credits: 3
Lecture Hours: 30
Lecture / Lab Hours: 0
Lab Hours: 0
Satisfies Cultural Literacy requirement: No
Satisfies General Education requirement: No
Grading options: A-F (default), P-NP, audit
Repeats available for credit: 0

Prerequisites

RD 115, WR 115 or equivalent placement test scores

Course Description

Develops the knowledge and skills necessary for creating inclusive environments and curricular activities. Provides training in the use of observation and assessment to scaffold young children’s understanding of science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics. Emphasizes using a variety of tools and methods to support, document, and extend children’s learning. Prerequisites: RD 115, WR 115 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

Intended Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Recognize historical influences and current trends of STEAM in education.
  2. Identify and apply early learning standards for children, birth to age 8, related to science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics.
  3. Explain and justify how children, birth to age 8, learn essential and foundational scientific, mathematical, and technological concepts.
  4. Use a variety of tools and methods to support, document, and extend children’s understanding of science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics.
  5. Design inclusive environments and curricular activities using observation and assessment to scaffold young children’s understanding of science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Assessments may include journal reflections, self-assessments, projects, research papers, quizzes, tests, and portfolio artifacts.

Texts and Materials

Cohen, L. A., & Waite-Stupiansky, S. (2020). STEM in Early Childhood Education. Routledge.

Additional Materials

National Center on Early Childhood Development, Teaching and Learning. (2020, August 12). Understanding STEAM and how children use it. ECLKC. https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/publication/understanding-steam-how-children-use-it

Course Activities and Design

The determination of teaching strategies used in the delivery of outcomes is generally left to the discretion of the instructor. Here are some strategies that you might consider when designing your course: lecture, small group/forum discussion, flipped classroom, dyads, oral presentation, role play, simulation scenarios, group projects, service learning projects, hands-on lab, peer review/workshops, cooperative learning (jigsaw, fishbowl), inquiry based instruction, differentiated instruction (learning centers), graphic organizers, etc.

Department Required Activities

This course should result in a minimum of one portfolio artifact for NAEYC Standard #5 – Knowledge, Application, and Integration of Academic Content in the Early Childhood Curriculum

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

Outcome #1: Recognize historical influences and current trends of STEAM in education.
  • Scientific Renaissance
  • Jean-Jacques Rousseau
  • Johann Pestalozzi
  • Jean Piaget
  • John Dewey
  • Friedrich Froebel
  • Loris Malaguzzi and the Reggio Emilia Approach
  • Seymour Papert – the father of the maker movement
  • The Maker Movement
  • Traditional schooling vs. Making
  • Constructivism and constructionism
  • Tinkering
  • Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM)
  • Integrating the Arts - Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math (STEAM)
Outcome #2: Identify and apply early learning standards for children, birth to age 8, related to science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics.
  • Early Learning Guidelines
    • Head Start Early Learning Outcomes Framework: Ages Birth to Five
    • Oregon’s Early Learning and Kindergarten Guidelines
    • Washington State Early Learning and Development Guidelines: Birth through 3rd Grade
    • Common Core State Standards
    • Next Generation Science Standards
Outcome #3: Explain and justify how children, birth to age 8, learn essential and foundational scientific, mathematical, and technological concepts.
  • Developmental progressions
  • Interrelationships of science, technology, engineering, math, and art
  • The role of play in development and learning
  • Learning methods and design models:
    • Scientific method
    • Learning cycle: awareness, exploration, inquiry, and utilization
    • Creative learning spiral: imagine, create, play, share, reflect
    • Think, make, improve
Outcome #4: Use a variety of tools and methods to support, document, and extend children’s understanding of science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics.
  • Tools and methods for scientific and mathematical inquiry:
    • Observation, comparison, reasoning, estimation and measurement, generation and testing of hypotheses, and documentation through writing, drawing, and graphic representation
  • Tools and methods for technology and engineering:
    • Imagining, data gathering, modeling, designing, evaluating, experimenting, and modifying
    • Using art and construction materials
    • Handling real tools
  • Documentation using technology, interactive media, and print to document projects in text, graphs, illustrations and data charts.
  • Differentiating instructional practices to respond to the individual strengths, needs, abilities, social identity, home culture, home language, interests, motivations, temperament, and positive and adverse experiences of each child
  • Apply the principles of universal design for learning
Outcome #5: Design inclusive environments and curricular activities using observation and assessment to scaffold young children’s understanding of science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics.
  • Observation and assessment
  • Types of learning experiences
    • Naturalistic
    • Informal learning
    • Adult-guided learning experiences
  • Elements of a good project – purpose and relevance, time, complexity, intensity, connection, access, shareability, novelty
  • Design challenges
  • Strategies to support diverse learners and learning styles
  • Strategies for countering biases and stereotypes
  • Incorporating STEAM into early learning environments
    • Physical – design and layout, including materials
    • Social – interactions between peers, teachers, and family members
    • Temporal – timing, sequence, length of routines and activities
  • Indoor and outdoor learning environments that support STEAM
    • Loose parts
    • Making and tinkering spaces
  • Maintaining safety guidelines while supporting healthy risk-taking 

Department Notes

NAEYC Standard:

  • #5 – Knowledge, Application, and Integration of Academic Content in the Early Childhood Curriculum

Oregon Core Knowledge Categories:

  • Human Growth and Development (HGD) - 10 hours
  • Learning Environments & Curriculum (LEC) - 10 hours
  • Observation and Assessment (OA) - 10 hours