Ceramics II - Studio

Course Number: ART 254
Transcript Title: Ceramics II - Studio
Created: June 13, 2016
Updated: April 2, 2020
Total Credits: 2
Lecture Hours: 0
Lecture / Lab Hours: 0
Lab Hours: 60
Satisfies Cultural Literacy requirement: No
Satisfies General Education requirement: No
Grading options: A-F (default), P-NP, audit
Repeats available for credit: 1

Prerequisites

Course Description

Provides semi-directed studio time to deepen understanding of basic ceramics processes, techniques and concepts introduced in ART 252. Encourages the development of individual style, character and self-identity while strengthening the ability to self-critique. May be taken two times for credit. Prerequisite: ART 252. Audit available.

Intended Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Research and develop strategies for creatively solving ceramic processes.
  2. Apply new processes, materials and techniques associated with hand building and wheel throwing to build personal expression.
  3. Ask meaningful questions, identify topical issues, and employ an expanding vocabulary in critical dialogue about ceramics with others.
  4. Implement expanded self-critiquing skills, supporting autonomous creative expression.
  5. Express individual style, character and self-identity, embracing the vision to be, do, feel, think and own a distinctive way of constructing ceramic form.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Presentations of individual works, peer and instructor critiques, observation of studio habits, use of vocabulary when communicating within the studio environment, sketch books, journals, maquettes, models, writing assignments, and tests.

Texts and Materials

Suggested student materials

  • Needle tool
  • Cutting wire
  • Sponge
  • Metal rib
  • Trim tool
  • Large wooden rib
  • Glaze brush
  • Plastic bucket
  • Cotton towel
  • Apron

Course Activities and Design

The determination of teaching strategies used in the delivery of outcomes is generally left to the discretion of the instructor. Here are some strategies that you might consider when designing your course: lecture, small group/forum discussion, flipped classroom, dyads, oral presentation, role play, simulation scenarios, group projects, service learning projects, hands-on lab, peer review/workshops, cooperative learning (jigsaw, fishbowl), inquiry based instruction, differentiated instruction (learning centers), graphic organizers, etc.

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

Outcome #1: Research and develp strategies for creatively solving ceramic processes.
  • The history and culture of ceramics as a part of the diverse human experience
  • Problem solving in creation of ceramic form - assking questions and finding new solutions using vocabulary, relevant ideas, materials, ceramic technique and application
  • Introduce relationship of form, content and function
  • Examination of aesthetic and structural solutions
Outcome #2: Apply new processes, materials and techniques associated with hand building and wheel throwing to build perrsonal expression.
  • Safe practices in regards to the handling of tools, chemicals and machinery in a communal studio space
  • Clay formation, properties - china clay, ball kaolins
  • Clay preparation - wedging
  • Hand building - forming ceramics without a wheel, including coil pots, pinch pots, slab pots, forming pots in Slump and Mump molds
  • Throwing - hand forming of hollow shapes on a revolving wheel head
  • Glazing techiniques - pour dipping, brushing (from peices of clay on half inches wide by 4 inchess tall to test application and flow of the glaze)
  • Basic glaze chemistry
  • Visual and verbal language used in discussion of practical, functional and artistic qualities of glazes
  • Enhancing both the technical and artisstic merit of Glaze Chemistry
  • Kiln technology, bisque
Outcome #3: Ask meaningful questions, identify topical issues, and employ an expanding vocabulary in critical dialogue about ceramics with others.
  • Continue expanding ceramics related vocabulary
  • Discuss new and emerging trends
  • Review contemporary styles and techniques
Outcome #4: Implement expanded self-critiquing skills, supporting autonomous creative expression
  • Use of sketch book or journal to record visual and physical effects of eutectics mixtures on ceramic form, structure and glaze surface
  • Critical analysis to deepen underrstanding of level of quality, posssible improvements, and high standards of achievement
  • Critique works of others
  • Practice critiquing of professional work
  • Critique using description ratherr than judgement
Outcome #5: Express individual style, character and self-identity, embracing the vision to be, do, feel, think and own a distinctive way of constructing ceramic form. 
  • Exploration of artist intent - know what you like
  • Application of skills and techniques needed to express intent or style

Department Notes

This is a lab course in which students practice and reinforce skills and knowledge learned in ART 252. Students are required to do little or no work outside of class.