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Creative Writing - Script Writing

Course Number: WR 243
Transcript Title: Creative Wr (Script Wr)
Created: September 1, 2012
Updated: December 19, 2014
Total Credits: 4
Lecture Hours: 40
Lecture / Lab Hours: 0
Lab Hours: 0
Satisfies Cultural Literacy requirement: No
Satisfies General Education requirement: Yes
Grading options: A-F (default), P-NP, audit

Prerequisites

WR 115 and RD 115 or equivalent placement test scores

Course Description

Focuses on writing and submitting theater and film scripts for class discussion and analysis. Studies established writers for techniques, structures, and styles. Prerequisites: WR 115 and RD 115 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

Intended Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Read and analyze established authors in order to become familiar with the elements of drama (eg. plot, character, diction, theme, and spectacle) as well as an understanding of how these elements combine to create a theatrical experience.
  2. Write an original script totaling at least 4,000 words that effectively uses the elements of the craft, demonstrating an understanding of the unification of form, content, and structure.
  3. Effectively edit own original script based on knowledge gained from close and analytical reading of peer scripts.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of proper formatting and the ability to prepare a script for production.
  5. Lead a workshop of a peer's script.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Assessment may include informal responses to reading and study questions; quizzes; evaluation of small and full-group discussion, in-class and out-of-class writing; writing scripts; revising scripts; participation in reading of scripts.

Because of the participatory nature of the workshop atmosphere of the course, consistent attendance is essential. The course grade is determined by appraisal of the students' writing, regularity of attendance in class and individual conferences, and active participation in class activities. 

Course Activities and Design

This course can include lecture, but will likely consist mostly of round-table workshops in which student work will be evaluated by the entire class. Students will come prepared to critique the work by responding to it either in discussion or in writing. Students may also read a variety of published scripts and view live or recorded performances for analysis. The instructor should spend approximately an hour of conference with each student outside of class.

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

  • Plot
  • Character
  • Scene
  • Voice
  • Diction
  • Theme
  • Sound/Music
  • Spectacle
  • Point of view
  • Dialogue
  • Conflict
  • Objectives
  • Obstacles
  • Stakes
  • Setting
  • Context
  • Tone/Language
  • Text
  • Subtext
  • Visual metaphors/Imagery
  • Pacing
  • Protagonist
  • Antagonist
  • Theatrical convention
  • Audience
  • Dramatic irony
  • Dramatic economy
  • Mimesis