Quantitative Literacy Value Scoring Rubric

Contact

Kristen Kane
Academic Assessment Coordinator
kkane@cgcc.edu, (541) 506-6036

This rubric was adapted by an interdisciplinary team representing Columbia Gorge Community College through a process that examined and modified the AACU Global Learning Value Rubric to meet the needs of CGCC's Institutional Core Learning Outcomes assessment. The rubric articulates fundamental criteria for each learning outcome, with performance descriptors demonstrating progressively more sophisticated levels of attainment. The rubric is intended for institutional-level use in evaluating and discussing student learning, not for grading. The CGCC team agrees with the utility of the AACU Value rubric, which “is to position learning at undergraduate levels within a basic framework of expectations such that evidence of learning can be shared nationally through a common dialog and understanding of student success”.

Definition

Quantitative Literacy (QL) – also known as Numeracy or Quantitative Reasoning (QR) – is a "habit of mind," competency, and comfort in working with numerical data. Individuals with strong QL skills possess the ability to reason and solve quantitative problems from a wide array of authentic contexts and everyday life situations. They understand and can create sophisticated arguments supported by quantitative evidence and they can clearly communicate those arguments in a variety of formats (using words, tables, graphs, mathematical equations, etc., as appropriate). “Habit of mind” is defined as “a disposition” and/or “intellectual behaviors”.

 

Adapted from AACU LEAP Intercultural Knowledge and Competence Rubric
* Required
Example: CAS 111, MTH 65, WR 121

Interpretation

Ability to explain information presented in mathematical forms (e.g., equations, graphs, diagrams, tables, words)

4 3 2 1 Not Demonstrated
0
Provides accurate explanations of information presented in mathematical forms. Makes appropriate inferences based on that information. For example, accurately explains the trend data shown in a graph and makes reasonable predictions regarding what the data suggest about future events. Provides accurate explanations of information presented in mathematical forms. For instance, accurately explains the trend data shown in a graph. Provides somewhat accurate explanations of information presented in mathematical forms, but occasionally makes minor errors related to computations or units. For instance, accurately explains trend data shown in a graph, but may miscalculate the slope of the trend line. Attempts to explain information presented in mathematical forms, but draws incorrect conclusions about what the information means. For example, attempts to explain the trend data shown in a graph, but will frequently misinterpret the nature of that trend, perhaps by confusing positive and negative trends. Ability to explain information presented in mathematical forms not demonstrated.

Representation

Ability to convert relevant information into various mathematical forms (e.g., equations, graphs, diagrams, tables, words)

4 3 2 1 Not Demonstrated
0
Skillfully converts relevant information into an insightful mathematical portrayal in a way that contributes to a further or deeper understanding. Competently converts relevant information into an appropriate and desired mathematical portrayal. Completes conversion of information but resulting mathematical portrayal is only partially appropriate or accurate. Completes conversion of information but resulting mathematical portrayal is inappropriate or inaccurate. Ability to convert relevant information into various mathematical forms not demonstrated.

Calculation

4 3 2 1 Not Demonstrated
0
Calculations attempted are essentially all successful and sufficiently comprehensive to solve the problem. Calculations are also presented elegantly (clearly, concisely, etc.) Calculations attempted are essentially all successful and sufficiently comprehensive to solve the problem. Calculations attempted are either unsuccessful or represent only a portion of the calculations required to comprehensively solve the problem. Calculations are attempted but are both unsuccessful and are not comprehensive. Calculations are not demonstrated.

Application / Analysis

Ability to make judgments and draw appropriate conclusions based on the quantitative analysis of data, while recognizing the limits of this analysis

4 3 2 1 Not Demonstrated
0
Uses the quantitative analysis of data as the basis for deep and thoughtful judgments, drawing insightful, carefully qualified conclusions from this work. Uses the quantitative analysis of data as the basis for competent judgments, drawing reasonable and appropriately qualified conclusions from this work. Uses the quantitative analysis of data as the basis for workmanlike (without inspiration or nuance, ordinary) judgments, drawing plausible conclusions from this work. Uses the quantitative analysis of data as the basis for tentative, basic judgments, although is hesitant or uncertain about drawing conclusions from this work. Ability to make judgments and draw appropriate conclusions based on the quantitative analysis of data not demonstrated.

Assumptions

Ability to make and evaluate important assumptions in estimation, modeling, and data analysis (e.g., assuming all samples were collected in the same manner)

4 3 2 1 Not Demonstrated
0
Explicitly describes assumptions and provides compelling rationale for why each assumption is appropriate. Shows awareness that confidence in final conclusions is limited by the accuracy of the assumptions. Explicitly describes assumptions and provides compelling rationale for why assumptions are appropriate. Explicitly describes assumptions. Attempts to describe assumptions. Ability to make and evaluate important assumptions in estimation, modeling, and data analysis not demonstrated.

Communication

Expressing quantitative evidence in support of the argument or purpose of the work (in terms of what evidence is used and how it is formatted, presented, and contextualized)(e.g., graph provided is relevant to conclusion)

4 3 2 1 Not Demonstrated
0
Uses quantitative information in connection with the argument or purpose of the work, presents it in an effective format, and explicates it with consistently high quality. Uses quantitative information in connection with the argument or purpose of the work, though data may be presented in a less than completely effective format or some parts of the explication may be uneven. Uses quantitative information, but does not effectively connect it to the argument or purpose of the work. Presents an argument for which quantitative evidence is pertinent, but does not provide adequate explicit numerical support. (May use quasi-quantitative words such as "many," "few," "increasing," "small," and the like in place of actual quantities.) Ability to express quantitative evidence in support of the argument or purpose of the work not demonstrated.