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English Composition

Course Number: WR 122
Transcript Title: English Composition
Created: September 1, 2012
Updated: March 10, 2014
Total Credits: 4
Lecture Hours: 40
Lecture / Lab Hours: 0
Lab Hours: 0
Satisfies Cultural Literacy requirement: No
Satisfies General Education requirement: No
Grading options: A-F (default), P-NP, audit

Prerequisites

WR 121

Course Description

Continues the focus of WR 121 on academic writing as a means of inquiry with added emphasis on persuasion and argument supported by external research. Uses critical reading, discussion and the writing process to explore ideas, develop cultural awareness and formulate original positions. Emphasizes development of writing and critical thinking through logical reasoning, rhetorical control, independent research and information literacy. Prerequisite: WR 121. Audit available.

Intended Outcomes

Upon completion of WR122 with a “C” or higher,students will be able to:

  1. Read closely and analytically to determine an author’s purpose, perspective and use of rhetorical strategies.
  2. Think critically to evaluate the reasoning and arguments of a variety of sources.
  3. Articulate their own position on complex topics with multiple points of view, contributing to the academic conversation through writing and discussion.
  4. Write for a variety of clearly defined purposes, audiences and contexts with control of key rhetorical strategies.
  5. Write persuasive essays that demonstrate a logical development of ideas and incorporate reasonable, credible evidence in support of a thesis.
  6. Locate, evaluate and use information effectively and ethically to develop an informed position and encourage intellectual curiosity.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Active discussion of assigned readings; occasional quizzes over the readings; demonstration of research and proper documentation (MLA) skills; writing of researched, properly documented essays.

Texts and Materials

The text(s) for the course is chosen by the individual instructor. Some instructors choose a textbook designed for composition courses, others use novels, nonfiction, and/or their own coursepacks.

Course Activities and Design

Daily discussions based on assigned readings; exercises in assessing appropriate research sources and proper documentation; successful completion of written assignments; participation in viewing and discussing current controversial issues; writing up short responses to the daily reading assignments; providing critical input to peer writings; occasional quizzes over reading assignments.

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

  • Identify and evaluate the basic structural components of written arguments, including core issue, claims, support and evidence.
  • Recognize and evaluate the role of voice, tone, diction, syntax, figurative language, modes and other stylistic features of written arguments.
  • Think critically to evaluate the reasoning and arguments of a variety of sources.
  • Evaluate the validity of evidence and relative authority of sources.
  • Analyze logical relationships between ideas.
  • Identify logical fallacies and distinguish bias and its impact on reliability.
  • Examine underlying assumptions of written arguments.
  • Distinguish between observations, inferences, fact and opinion, subjective and objective approaches.
  • Establish relationships among multiple sources and perspectives.
  • Articulate one’s own position on complex topics with multiple points of view, contributing to the academic conversation through writing and discussion.
  • Participate in class and small group discussions and activities reflectively.
  • Assess and question personal knowledge and beliefs in the context of an open exchange of ideas.
  • Take responsibility for the reliability and validity of one’s positions.
  • Fairly and objectively weigh the experience and viewpoints of others against personal experience and assumptions.
  • Write for a variety of clearly defined purposes, audiences, and contexts with control of key rhetorical audiences.
  • Write persuasive essays that demonstrate a logical development of ideas and incorporate reasonable, credible evidence in support of a thesis.
  • Locate, evaluate and use information effectively and ethically to develop an informed position and encourage intellectual curiosity.
  • Create a bibliography and provide in-text documentation using discipline appropriate MLA documentation style.
  • Develop organizational skills to pursue an in-depth research and writing project.
  • Avoid plagiarism.
  • Use research actively as a process of independent inquiry and in service of argument rather than passive report.